“Brancusi in New York 1913–2013” at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: The Newborn, Mademoiselle Pogany II, Sleeping Muse II, Head and Fish. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

The Armory Show, 1913. Brancusi’s ”mobile group” is on the left.
The image is published in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013” by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Celebrating a hundred years after Constantin Brancusi’s debut at The Armory Show – the first large exhibition of contemporary art in America organized by the Association of American Painters and Sculptors in 1913 – Paul Kasmin Gallery, in partnership with the Brancusi Estate, presents the exhibition ‘Brancusi in New York 1913-2013’. The exhibition will be on show from November 7, 2013 to January 25, 2014 at the 515 West 27th Street gallery’s location in New York, the city where 90 per cent of the Paris-based Romanian artist’s works were sold during his lifetime (1876-1957), to which he undoubtedly owes the unfolding of his career.

”Without the Americans I would not have been able to produce all these or even to have existed.” Constantin Brancusi, The New York Times Magazine, October 23, 1955. (October 26, 1955 – January 8, 1956, Brancusi retrospective at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.)

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: The Newborn, Mademoiselle Pogany II, Fish, Sleeping Muse II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Head’, ‘Mademoiselle Pogany II’, ‘The Newborn’, ‘Sleeping Muse II’, and the ‘Fish’ are the five bronze masterpieces on display which testify to Brancusi’s unsurpassed sculptural frugality and witness how much he was inspired by the Romanian folk art and African sculpture. Admiration of Brancusi’s oeuvre and his influence on modern sculpture history has never waned seen by the likes of artists such as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Jeff Koons and Richard Serra who have dedicated some of their artworks to him. As for his relevance in today’s art world, suffice it to say that on February 23, 2009, his rare wooden ”Madame L.R.” sculpture sold for $37.6 million at the Yves Saint Laurent/Pierre Bergé sale at Christie’s in Paris, hitting number eight in the list of the ten highest prices ever paid for a sculpture as of November 2013.

Brancusi’s exhibition at Paul Kasmin Gallery has been designed by studioMDA’s founder Markus Dochantschi andinvites the viewer to experience the non-linear geometry of the five sculptures within the linear pattern of the exhibition layout, which Dochantschi modeled after the Manhattan grid. ”Manhattan is my large-scale studio. …How is it similar to my studio? Because nothing is static. Nothing is fixed. All these buildings, all these forms, are interchangeable and can move as experience evolves and changes.”- Constantin Brancusi.

Midtown Manhattan skyline from Brooklyn, circa 1930; Brancusi’s studio, 1941. Photograph by Brancusi.
Spread from the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, published by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Bronze Mademoiselle Pogany II, 1920. Photograph by Brancusi.
The cover of the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, published by ASSOULINE.
Courtesy of ASSOULINE.

Italian actress Sylvana Mangano at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1956, with Mademoiselle Pogany and Endless Column.
The image is featured in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, published by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

On the occasion of the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, a fully illustrated catalogue published byASSOULINE, chronicles the artist’s success in New York City and his impact on its artistic milieu with astonishing archival imagery. According to Brancusi: ”When one is immersed in beauty, there is no need for explanations”. The beautiful story of the mutually beneficial relationship between the so called ”patriarch of modern sculpture” and the Big Apple which you will find inside ASSOULINE’s publication couldn’t have been better explained by the authority on Brancusi,Jérôme Neutres and Theodor Nicol, the owner of the Brancusi Estate and the sole holder of Brancusi’s copyrights.

Brancusi in New York 1913–2013
November 7, 2013–January 11, 2014
Paul Kasmin Gallery
515 West 27th Street
New York, New York

Tip: Discover Constantin Brancusi’s spiritual roots through an essay written by Aidan Hart, an ordained Reader of the Greek Orthodox Church who lives in the United Kingdom. Hart has also been a professional icon painter and carver for over twenty-five years. An extract from the essay follows: His aphorisms show a marked similarity to the teachings contained in the hymns that he would have chanted and to other mystical writings of the Orthodox Church, most notably the teaching on the inner essences or logoi of things. Compare, for  example, the text below from the seventh century saint,Maximus the Confessor, with the aphorism of Brancusi which follows it: ”Do not stop short of the outward appearance which visible things present to the senses,” writes Maximus, ”but seek with your intellect to contemplate their inner essences (logoi), seeing them as images of spiritual realities…” And Brancusi’s words: ”They are imbeciles who call my work  abstract; that which they call abstract is the most realist, because what is real is not the  exterior form but the idea, the essence of things.

Constantin Brancusi, La Muse Endormie, 1923-2010, polished bronze, 7 3/8 x 10 1/4 x 6 1/8 inches, edition of 8. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{Sleeping Muse II (1923), whose first version attracted the most attention in 1913, resulted in his first requests from collectors for bronze editions. It features also an abstracted face of a woman, like Mademoiselle Pogany II’s serpentine figure beckons the viewer with her subdued look. Sleeping Muse II transforms the viewer into a voyeur watching over the sleeping woman with delicate suggestions of a nose, large oval-shaped closed eyes, and a half-open mouth.}

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: Sleeping Muse II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Constantin Brancusi, Tete, 1920-1992, polished bronze, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 11 3/4 inches, edition of
5. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{Head (circa 1920), made from polished bronze and measuring 7.5 by 9.5 by 11.75 inches in an edition of 5, illustrates how, in the words of Eugene Ionesco, ”[Brancusi] had assimilated the entire history of sculpture, mastered it, gone beyond it, rejected it, come back to it, purified it, reinvented it. He had got it down to its essence.” With Head, Brancusi’s inquiry into the totemic nature of masks resulted in an interpretation that encapsulated his most complete geometric abstraction.}

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: Sleeping Muse II, Mademoiselle Pogany II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Constantin Brancusi, Mademoiselle Pogany II, 1925-2006, polished bronze, Sculpture: 16 7/8 x 7 x 11 3/4 inches, Overall: 27 x 10 x 8 3/4 inches, edition of 8. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{Mademoiselle Pogany II (1925), stands at 11.7 inches tall, in an edition of 8. The plaster model of the first version debuted at the Armory Show in 1913. The series of Mademoiselle Pogany was his most photographed work. Today this polished bronze version of Mademoiselle Pogany II still embodies the inexpressible nature of the feminine spirit.}

Constantin Brancusi, Le Poisson, 1926-1992, polished bronze, 5 3/4 inches high x 17 3/4 inches in diameter, edition of 8. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{With Fish (1926), the artist advances his study of sculpture into a moving artwork. Fish, a polished bronze sculpture measuring 5.3 x 16.5 x 1.2 inches in an edition of 8, rotates on its disc allowing the sculpture to mimic the movement and spirit of its subject. Fish was born out of Brancusi’s goal to capture a creature’s movement, one he worked obsessively towards.}

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: Mademoiselle Pogany II, Sleeping Muse II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Constantin Brancusi, Le Nouveau Né I, 1920-2003, polished bronze, 5 3/4 x 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches, edition of 8. Photography by Harald Gottschalk /© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{”We do not see real life except by its reflection,” wrote Brancusi in 1919, and with The Newborn (1920) Brancusi created his most radically abstract sculpture representing not only the act of birth but also the newborn baby. Previously Brancusi named it Beginning of the World, referencing the violence with which human life begins. But Brancusi tempers this association with the smooth lines of the sculpture, bringing serenity into the subject matter.}

Brancusi at Voulangis, in Edward Steichen’s garden. Photograph by Edward Steichen.
The image is published in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013” by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Brancusi’s studio, Paris, 1955. Photograph by Alexander Liberman.
The image is published in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013” by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

sources:

Paul Kasmin GalleryASSOULINE

  1. #1 by mobile website on januar 24, 2014 - 3:25 am

    Your style is really unique in comparison to other folks I have read stuff from.
    Many thanks for posting when you have the opportunity, Guess I’ll just bookmark
    this web site.

  2. #2 by หนังสือการ์ตูนa on april 2, 2014 - 10:32 am

    Good post. I learn something new and challenging on blogs I
    stumbleupon every day. It’s always interesting to read content
    from other authors and use something from other websites.

  3. #3 by x men days of future past film on august 8, 2014 - 3:58 pm

    Now I am ready to do my breakfast, once having my breakfast coming yet again to read
    additional news.

  4. #4 by dungeon hunter 4 hack apk on august 19, 2014 - 11:34 pm

    Good day very nice blog!! Man .. Beautiful .. Amazing ..

    I’ll bookmark your site and take the feeds additionally?
    I’m glad to search out a lot of useful info here in the submit, we need work out
    extra techniques on this regard, thanks for sharing.
    . . . . .

Skriv et svar

Udfyld dine oplysninger nedenfor eller klik på et ikon for at logge ind:

WordPress.com Logo

Du kommenterer med din WordPress.com konto. Log Out / Skift )

Twitter picture

Du kommenterer med din Twitter konto. Log Out / Skift )

Facebook photo

Du kommenterer med din Facebook konto. Log Out / Skift )

Google+ photo

Du kommenterer med din Google+ konto. Log Out / Skift )

Connecting to %s