Archive for category Galleri

“Brancusi in New York 1913–2013” at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: The Newborn, Mademoiselle Pogany II, Sleeping Muse II, Head and Fish. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

The Armory Show, 1913. Brancusi’s ”mobile group” is on the left.
The image is published in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013” by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Celebrating a hundred years after Constantin Brancusi’s debut at The Armory Show – the first large exhibition of contemporary art in America organized by the Association of American Painters and Sculptors in 1913 – Paul Kasmin Gallery, in partnership with the Brancusi Estate, presents the exhibition ‘Brancusi in New York 1913-2013’. The exhibition will be on show from November 7, 2013 to January 25, 2014 at the 515 West 27th Street gallery’s location in New York, the city where 90 per cent of the Paris-based Romanian artist’s works were sold during his lifetime (1876-1957), to which he undoubtedly owes the unfolding of his career.

”Without the Americans I would not have been able to produce all these or even to have existed.” Constantin Brancusi, The New York Times Magazine, October 23, 1955. (October 26, 1955 – January 8, 1956, Brancusi retrospective at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.)

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: The Newborn, Mademoiselle Pogany II, Fish, Sleeping Muse II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Head’, ‘Mademoiselle Pogany II’, ‘The Newborn’, ‘Sleeping Muse II’, and the ‘Fish’ are the five bronze masterpieces on display which testify to Brancusi’s unsurpassed sculptural frugality and witness how much he was inspired by the Romanian folk art and African sculpture. Admiration of Brancusi’s oeuvre and his influence on modern sculpture history has never waned seen by the likes of artists such as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Jeff Koons and Richard Serra who have dedicated some of their artworks to him. As for his relevance in today’s art world, suffice it to say that on February 23, 2009, his rare wooden ”Madame L.R.” sculpture sold for $37.6 million at the Yves Saint Laurent/Pierre Bergé sale at Christie’s in Paris, hitting number eight in the list of the ten highest prices ever paid for a sculpture as of November 2013.

Brancusi’s exhibition at Paul Kasmin Gallery has been designed by studioMDA’s founder Markus Dochantschi andinvites the viewer to experience the non-linear geometry of the five sculptures within the linear pattern of the exhibition layout, which Dochantschi modeled after the Manhattan grid. ”Manhattan is my large-scale studio. …How is it similar to my studio? Because nothing is static. Nothing is fixed. All these buildings, all these forms, are interchangeable and can move as experience evolves and changes.”- Constantin Brancusi.

Midtown Manhattan skyline from Brooklyn, circa 1930; Brancusi’s studio, 1941. Photograph by Brancusi.
Spread from the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, published by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Bronze Mademoiselle Pogany II, 1920. Photograph by Brancusi.
The cover of the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, published by ASSOULINE.
Courtesy of ASSOULINE.

Italian actress Sylvana Mangano at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1956, with Mademoiselle Pogany and Endless Column.
The image is featured in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, published by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

On the occasion of the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013”, a fully illustrated catalogue published byASSOULINE, chronicles the artist’s success in New York City and his impact on its artistic milieu with astonishing archival imagery. According to Brancusi: ”When one is immersed in beauty, there is no need for explanations”. The beautiful story of the mutually beneficial relationship between the so called ”patriarch of modern sculpture” and the Big Apple which you will find inside ASSOULINE’s publication couldn’t have been better explained by the authority on Brancusi,Jérôme Neutres and Theodor Nicol, the owner of the Brancusi Estate and the sole holder of Brancusi’s copyrights.

Brancusi in New York 1913–2013
November 7, 2013–January 11, 2014
Paul Kasmin Gallery
515 West 27th Street
New York, New York

Tip: Discover Constantin Brancusi’s spiritual roots through an essay written by Aidan Hart, an ordained Reader of the Greek Orthodox Church who lives in the United Kingdom. Hart has also been a professional icon painter and carver for over twenty-five years. An extract from the essay follows: His aphorisms show a marked similarity to the teachings contained in the hymns that he would have chanted and to other mystical writings of the Orthodox Church, most notably the teaching on the inner essences or logoi of things. Compare, for  example, the text below from the seventh century saint,Maximus the Confessor, with the aphorism of Brancusi which follows it: ”Do not stop short of the outward appearance which visible things present to the senses,” writes Maximus, ”but seek with your intellect to contemplate their inner essences (logoi), seeing them as images of spiritual realities…” And Brancusi’s words: ”They are imbeciles who call my work  abstract; that which they call abstract is the most realist, because what is real is not the  exterior form but the idea, the essence of things.

Constantin Brancusi, La Muse Endormie, 1923-2010, polished bronze, 7 3/8 x 10 1/4 x 6 1/8 inches, edition of 8. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{Sleeping Muse II (1923), whose first version attracted the most attention in 1913, resulted in his first requests from collectors for bronze editions. It features also an abstracted face of a woman, like Mademoiselle Pogany II’s serpentine figure beckons the viewer with her subdued look. Sleeping Muse II transforms the viewer into a voyeur watching over the sleeping woman with delicate suggestions of a nose, large oval-shaped closed eyes, and a half-open mouth.}

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: Sleeping Muse II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Constantin Brancusi, Tete, 1920-1992, polished bronze, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 11 3/4 inches, edition of
5. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{Head (circa 1920), made from polished bronze and measuring 7.5 by 9.5 by 11.75 inches in an edition of 5, illustrates how, in the words of Eugene Ionesco, ”[Brancusi] had assimilated the entire history of sculpture, mastered it, gone beyond it, rejected it, come back to it, purified it, reinvented it. He had got it down to its essence.” With Head, Brancusi’s inquiry into the totemic nature of masks resulted in an interpretation that encapsulated his most complete geometric abstraction.}

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: Sleeping Muse II, Mademoiselle Pogany II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Constantin Brancusi, Mademoiselle Pogany II, 1925-2006, polished bronze, Sculpture: 16 7/8 x 7 x 11 3/4 inches, Overall: 27 x 10 x 8 3/4 inches, edition of 8. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{Mademoiselle Pogany II (1925), stands at 11.7 inches tall, in an edition of 8. The plaster model of the first version debuted at the Armory Show in 1913. The series of Mademoiselle Pogany was his most photographed work. Today this polished bronze version of Mademoiselle Pogany II still embodies the inexpressible nature of the feminine spirit.}

Constantin Brancusi, Le Poisson, 1926-1992, polished bronze, 5 3/4 inches high x 17 3/4 inches in diameter, edition of 8. Photography by Francois Halard/© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{With Fish (1926), the artist advances his study of sculpture into a moving artwork. Fish, a polished bronze sculpture measuring 5.3 x 16.5 x 1.2 inches in an edition of 8, rotates on its disc allowing the sculpture to mimic the movement and spirit of its subject. Fish was born out of Brancusi’s goal to capture a creature’s movement, one he worked obsessively towards.}

Constantin Brancusi. From left to right: Mademoiselle Pogany II, Sleeping Muse II and Head. Installation view at Paul Kasmin Gallery during the exhibition ”Brancusi in New York 1913–2013”. Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Constantin Brancusi, Le Nouveau Né I, 1920-2003, polished bronze, 5 3/4 x 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches, edition of 8. Photography by Harald Gottschalk /© Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/ADAGP, Paris. / Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.
{”We do not see real life except by its reflection,” wrote Brancusi in 1919, and with The Newborn (1920) Brancusi created his most radically abstract sculpture representing not only the act of birth but also the newborn baby. Previously Brancusi named it Beginning of the World, referencing the violence with which human life begins. But Brancusi tempers this association with the smooth lines of the sculpture, bringing serenity into the subject matter.}

Brancusi at Voulangis, in Edward Steichen’s garden. Photograph by Edward Steichen.
The image is published in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013” by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Brancusi’s studio, Paris, 1955. Photograph by Alexander Liberman.
The image is published in the book ”Brancusi in New York 1913-2013” by ASSOULINE.
Image Courtesy of the Brancusi Estate and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

sources:

Paul Kasmin GalleryASSOULINE

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“Minicry chairs” – By NENDO

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London Design Festival: white metal chairs are stacked in a tower and clustered on staircases around the V&A museum as part of an installation by Japanese design studioNendo (+ slideshow).

Above photograph is by Daici Ano

The Mimicry Chairs are made from pressed and punched metal finished in white – an intentionally simple design which stands out from the museum’s ornate interior.

Mimicry chairs by nendo

Above photograph is by Daici Ano

Each installation responds to its own space in the museum, with chairs joined together by variously sized backrests to reflect picture frames on the walls, or stacked up high near an outdoor staircase.

Mimicry Chairs by Nendo

“The museum offered us eleven different spaces and they told us to choose one, but we said that we wanted to use all of them,” said Oki Sato of Nendo at the press preview on Friday. “So we took one chair and let it evolve throughout the museum.”

Above photograph is by Daici Ano

Other installations at the museum as part of London Design Festival include Prism by Keiichi Matsuda, a digital installation that visualises data streams from across the city, and The Journey of a Drop by Rolf Sachs, in which drops of coloured ink fall from a great height into a tank of water.

The museum is also showing four pieces of contemporary furniture recently acquired for its permanent collection, including the Bone chaise and its mould by Joris Laarman.

Mimicry Chairs by Nendo

Above photograph is by Daici Ano

 

Photographs are by Susan Smart except where otherwise stated.

Above photograph is by Daici Ano

Mimicry Chairs by Nendo

Japanese design studio Nendo has created a simple chair archetype made from pressed and punched metal painted white giving it an almost ghost-like appearance.

These chairs will be placed within the Grand Entrance and further locations throughout the Museum including galleries, staircases and corridors.

At each site, the chair is modified to mimic the space it inhabits and the objects around it. In some locations visitors may sit on the chairs and observe and appreciate the collections from different perspectives.

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Decadent Pigeons Take Over Barcelona

photo © Lisa Klappe

We have a lot in common with pigeons, even if we are not always willing to admit it. If you think about it, we share the same streets, the same parks and the same urban landscapes, we love big city life as much as they do and we often dirty and damage our environment. Bird lovers will also tell you about their intelligence, their capacity to remember the people that feed them and their ability to recognize all 26 letters of the English language. There are also people who all but despise them, maybe because of their tendency to use (without even asking) our balconies. Biblical references apart, pigeons are one of the most misunderstood animals around, with a range of roles from love messenger to decadent parasite. PhotographerLisa Klappe and visual artist Joachim Van Den Hurk always wanted to do something in their defense and that’s how they decided to start with their Decadent Pigeons project, an artsy apology of a sometimes shameless bird.

photo © Lisa Klappe

The first edition of the Decadent Pigeons project was held in Barcelona in 2010 and, after various spin offs in Eindhoven and Maastricht, the second edition landed some days ago again in the Catalan capitalJoachim Van Den Hurk andLisa Klappe set up a very interesting mix of installations, photography, video and conceptual work at Gallery Casa Elizalde(12 January – 02 February) that made us question the relationship we all have with urban pigeons. Their goal was to explore the tension, as they say, between ugliness and beauty. Questions of fear and decadence, the price we pay in order to survive in contemporary societies and the parallel lines between humans and pigeons as urban survivals were raised, with a very interesting response from the public. Tattoo artist Darko Oneness was also at the exhibition opening and continued the series of ‘iconic pigeons’ tattoos he started for Kiki van Eijk and Joost van Bleiswijk in Eindhoven. Under the lemma ‘Be decadent, get tattooed‘ the visitors were given the opportunity to ‘take’ a pigeon home with them after the end of the exhibition.  Lisa Klappe and Joachim Van Den Hurk already have plans to migrate their project, this time to Paris, and her at Rumtosset I will definitely keep you updated. After all, this is a bird’s life!

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

photo © Lisa Klappe

Joachim Van Den Hurk / photo © Lisa Klappe
(Eindhoven, 1954) is a spatial artist, graduated from the Academy of Art as architectural designer. He worked for several years with architectural firms in The Netherlands. After he left Holland and developed his passion for landscaping and organized exhibitions. Since the 80’s he works as an independent artist and designer. Exhibitions of his works were on view in The Netherlands, France, and Australia. Today by turns he lives and works in Barcelona and the south of France.

Lisa Klappe / photo © Lisa Klappe
(Eindhoven, 1979) is a photographer of people, design and fashion. In 2006 she finished her studies at Amsterdam Photo Academy. Since then she works as an independent photographer and editor, both for herself and on commission. Her photographs are a staged registration of the way she sees, discovers and experiences her surroundings. With a clear eye for detail she creates a subtle tension between beauty and repulsiveness. In that way even ugliness becomes aesthetical, but never without telling a story.

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